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result or results

“Result” vs. “Results” in verb form

In an article I read, there was this line:

And most simply, using and consuming fewer products result in less waste.

I know sentences aren’t supposed to start with the word “and,” but I’d like to focus on the bold word: “result.”

When used in this sentence, “result” sounds wrong. It seems to refer to “using and consuming,” so shouldn’t it be “results?”

And most simply, using and consuming fewer products results in less waste.

2 Answers 2

The correct word is results.

Look at it like this:

[using and consuming fewer products] results in less waste.

The word “results” refers to the bracketed section.

Swap in a different action to see that “results” sounds better:

[studying] results in preparedness.

[running and jogging] results in fat loss.

First you have to adhere to one of the following schools of thought

  1. Rob and Mandy are going to school.
  2. Rob and Mandy is going to school.

School #1 seems to be the overwhelming choice among most, if not all, speakers of English.

Then let us use perturbation theory (the theory mostly used in Maths, where you could introduce small amounts of changes/perturbation repeatedly to inductively prove that a resultant condition originated from an initial assumption)

  • George and Dorasamy are my favourite students.
  • Eating icecream and Dorasamy are constantly occupying my mind.
  • Eating icecream and Dorasamy do not mix well together.
  • Eating icecream and dieting do not mix well together.
  • Eating icecream and dieting result in conflicting goals.

using and consuming fewer products result in less waste.

“Result” vs. “Results” in verb form In an article I read, there was this line: And most simply, using and consuming fewer products result in less waste. I know sentences aren’t supposed