Categories
BLOG

win cnc

Win cnc

WinCNC is software and hardware package that allows control of a CNC machine using a Windows PC. The hardware consists of a PCI card and daughter board which are installed inside of the PC. Both items are required to run WinCNC. The PCI card is a 64-bit high-speed digital I/O device and the daughter board is a small circuit board which adds a high speed microprocessor for pulse buffering. The high speed pulse buffer allows WinCNC to output pulses with 100% accuracy at maximum frequency, and increases it’s ability to run alongside other Windows applications and processes without losing steps. The CNC machine components such as stepper/servo drives, limit switches, or output relays are connected to the PC via 37-pin (standard) or 25-pin (optional) connectors at the back of the PC. WinCNC outputs TTL step and direction signals to the motor drives and includes additional TTL input and output pins for auxiliary functions to interface the I/O from the CNC machine.

To simplify the process of wiring and connecting your CNC machine to the PC, without the need for soldering or making custom cables, please consider one of our screw-terminal based WinCNC IO interface boards. These interface boards provide on-board 5VDC power, output relays, input isolation, and easy access to step/direction signals to control stepper or servo motors.

WinCNC provides a customizable easy-to-use interface for any operation. The CNC machine can be completely controlled using the PC mouse and keyboard. Button customization allows for simple point and click control, without the need for typing file names or GCode commands. Button and toolbar size can be enlarged to accommodate the use of a touch screen monitor. Remote control can be added using one of our wired or wireless hand-held keypads.

WinCNC Controller sets the standard for PC based motion control. Incredibly smooth acceleration and machine motion are the result of our advanced algorithms. WinCNC uses a large look-ahead buffer, reading thousands of lines ahead while running GCode files. Reading ahead allows WinCNC to accelerate or decelerate through many small arc or line segments producing smoother motion and faster completion times. Each move is buffered and processed using proprietary real time vector matching routines. The result is that your machine runs as smoothly and efficiently as possible, slowing down only when necessary and producing high quality parts. Adjustable velocity, acceleration, and smoothing allow you to configure WinCNC to operate any size or type of CNC machine as quickly and smoothly as possible.

CNC Plasma cutting has been increasingly popular in recent years. Many new features and enhancements have been added to WinCNC to support the requirments of plasma cutting and automatic torch height control.

WinCNC has been used on laser machines for many years by many satisfied customers. WinCNC can be used on any stepper or servo laser machine and has been used with Synrad, Coherent, and other types of lasers. WinCNC supports raster image engraving and vector engraving and cutting.

WinCNC has been in use on CNC router machines for many years. It has been used by thousands of customers worldwide. WinCNC is used extensively with Cut 2D/3D, VCarve Pro, Aspire, EnRoute, BobCAD, VisualMill, and many other CAD/CAM packages.

WinCNC Controller is a CNC machine motion control software and hardware package that is compatible with Windows 7, 8, and 10 – 32 bit and 64 bit versions. Legacy versions of WinCNC were compatible with Windows 95, 98, ME, 2000, and XP. WinCNC requires an enabled USB port and an available PCI or PCIe slot. WinCNC is capable of driving up to 6 axes of motion simultaneously at up to 100khz while remaining incredibly smooth and never missing a step.

NOTE: Windows 8 and 10 require WinCNC version 2.6 or 3.0. Please make sure that your software license and hardware are capable of supporting WinCNC version 2.6 or 3.0 before upgrading your Windows OS.

NOTE: WinCNC 3.0 requires a different daughter board than 2.6 or previous versions. If you are running a 2.6 or older version of WinCNC you will have to upgrade your software and purchase a new daughter board in order to run WinCNC 3.0

Any stepper, micro-stepper, or servo system with step and direction inputs can be interfaced using the included PCI card and microprocessor daughter board, or one of several available PCI I/O expansion cards. In addition to axis motion, up to 128 auxiliary outputs and 128 separate inputs may be defined. The intuitive user interface is easy to learn and convenient to use. All the features you need and expect are readily accessible via industry standard G-Codes. Simple keystrokes provide the ability to start, pause, restart, jog, and rapid transit any axis without navigating multiple screens and windows. Programs may be run from any line as needed. The programmed feed rates may be adjusted from 1% to 200% without stopping machine motion.

WinCNC Controller is running machines with routers, drills, tapping heads, rotating saws and knives, plasma cutters, gas cutters, nailers, grinders, water jets, and lasers to process materials ranging from hardwoods, composites, and plastics to metals, glass, and stone. All major CAM packages can produce G-Code files ready to run on WinCNC Controller. The WinCNC window is highly customizable, with several types of components and buttons that can be added and customized. The macro setup allows creating custom G/L/M codes linked to editable subprograms, storing values and performing basic math operations, even overriding or disabling already defined G/L/M codes.

Any motion control system is only as good as the support available when you need it. Our technicians use our products every day for production and prototyping. This means that we can speak your language when it comes to providing the support you need, either by phone, Internet, or onsite worldwide. WinCNC retail software packages include 30 days of free technical support via phone/Internet/email. Support techinicians are available via phone or email Monday thru Friday 9AM-5PM EST excluding holidays. Additional technical support can be purchased, per hour, for existing WinCNC software licenses. Customers must have Internet access and must be able to send/receive files via email in order to receive technical support.

Win cnc WinCNC is software and hardware package that allows control of a CNC machine using a Windows PC. The hardware consists of a PCI card and daughter board which are installed inside of the

Thread: WinCNC Good or not?

Thread Tools
  • Show Printable Version
  • Email this Page…
  • Subscribe to this Thread…
  • Display all images
  • Search Thread

    WinCNC Good or not?

    Doing homework before purchasing a CNC router. Some of the more interesting machines from Cammaster and Shop Saber both employ WinCNC. There is something inherently distasteful about having to depend on Microsoft to operate machinery. I am a retired IT professional and after fighting MS problems for decades, anything Microsoft is immediately suspect what with all the vulnerabilities to virus, scum-ware, malware, instability and on and on. Not to mention the endless reboots and updates which are notorious for breaking things like device drivers. It looks like WinCNC also adds about $1000.00 (possibly more) to the price of any given machine.

    I would like to hear form some experienced WinCNC users. Am I being too skeptical? Have you experienced any issues caused by Windows? Would you recommend WinCNC?

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    Yes, you are far too skeptical. Windows is not really the issue you think it is, except among the Windows haters.

    Only if you compare it to nothing controlling the machine. The machine has to have a control, which is going to cost money.

    I think that Camaster and Shop Sabre have decided that WinCNC is the most robust “low cost” controller available.
    The alternatives are the lower cost “hobby level” controls, which would probably be a support nightmare for those companies, or higher end industrial controls that can cost a lot more than $1000. Unless you were to go for a chinese control, with no or limited support.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    Thanks for the reply. It is interesting that you refer to WinCNC as a low cost controller. My only limited hands on experience is with a CNC Shark that uses a small windows app to execute the G code and position the router. It came free with the machine and required little processing power to run. It probably would be considered a toy machine but was enough to wet my appetite for a real machine. I discovered WinCNC during my research and it came as a surprise the complexity and cost of it. Obviously there is more to it than I realize. There are machines that are controlled by a handheld “Pendant” that comes with the machine. What is the disadvantage to such a device?

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    It’s not free, as the price is rolled into the price of the machine. There’s also some electronics involved, that cost maybe $100-$150.

    These are almost always chinese. The disadvantage is flexibility. With a pendant controller, you get what you get. With better controls, you have a lot of ability to customize the control.

    As I mentioned, the reason they are using WinCNC is because it’s a more powerful, and stable package, which minimizes their support costs.

    My personal belief, is that some of the cheaper hobby controls, like LinuxCNC or UCCNC, can be every bit as good as something like WinCNC.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    Wincnc is a great controller if you want to spend a lot of money. Look at planet-cnc MK3 or Mach 4 with smoothstepper. You will go from $1500 to about $250-300.

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    Yes, I see that butthe machine under consideration is the ShopSabre 23 and they do not offer any alternatives to WinCNC.

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    I bought a practical cnc router running Wincnc. I ran the heck out of it literally 6 hour programs sometimes 3d carving with not a problem. On the other hand I converted a lathe to cnc using Mach3 and would consider that more of a tinkertoy, always seemed to have to mess with something.
    The Wincnc has it’s own motion control card so windows doesn’t really affect the program and I found it to be very stable.

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    That’s good to hear. Thanks!

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    technoholic..
    “It is interesting that you refer to WinCNC as a low cost controller.”

    That’s because the next step up is 4 to 5 times more costly. And just to be clear, with hardware, software and licensing fees the retail is over $2k, and worth every penny. I do service work for WinCNC customers and retrofit a good number of machines with WinCNC control. The majority of these are 10-15 year old machines where the OEM wants $10K-$15K for new control.

    There are close to a dozen branded machines that use WinCNC control. Some use WinCNC provided computers, cables and I/O boards, while others substitute cost saving alternatives such as cheapo computers, Chinese BOB’s or even worse, a simple pin to pin BOB with no opto isolation or buffering at all. I use only OEM WinCNC products with my REZurrection line of control for WinCNC. I would want to know what I was buying if I were you.

    If you have any questions I can answer, fire away!

    Here is a link showing their top of the line I/O board posted on a similar thread on the Vectric forum: (last post) Vectric Forum ? View topic – Anyone Use Wincnc?

    Re: WinCNC Good or not?

    technoholic..
    “It is interesting that you refer to WinCNC as a low cost controller.”

    That’s because the next step up is 4 to 5 times more costly. And just to be clear, with hardware, software and licensing fees the retail is over $2k, and worth every penny. I do service work for WinCNC customers and retrofit a good number of machines with WinCNC control. The majority of these are 10-15 year old machines where the OEM wants $10K-$15K for new control.

    There are close to a dozen branded machines that use WinCNC control. Some use WinCNC provided computers, cables and I/O boards, while others substitute cost saving alternatives such as cheapo computers, Chinese BOB’s or even worse, a simple pin to pin BOB with no opto isolation or buffering at all. I use only OEM WinCNC products with my REZurrection line of control for WinCNC. I would want to know what I was buying if I were you.

    If you have any questions I can answer, fire away!

    Here is a link showing their top of the line I/O board posted on a similar thread on the Vectric forum: (last post) Vectric Forum ? View topic – Anyone Use Wincnc?

    I am learning a lot more than expected going into CNC and am looking very hard at a ShopSabre 23 machine. They as well as Cammaster sell their machines with a PC and WinCNC. I expect the supplied computer will be minimalist implementation so it will be dedicated to machine control only. ShopSabre supplied machine runs Windows 10 Home, 64 bit with 4GB of RAM which is bare minimum for Windows 10. I will probably add more RAM. Are you familiar with ShopSabre?

    After following the links you posted (thanks for that) I am getting more comfortable with WinCNC as the control implementation of choice. Also feeling good about ShopSabre 23 as the right machine for me. I probably should add that I am not an industrial user, just an old retired guy that likes to play in his wood shop. Thanks for the input!

    Last edited by technoholic; 08-17-2017 at 02:20 PM .

    Doing homework before purchasing a CNC router. Some of the more interesting machines from Cammaster and Shop Saber both employ WinCNC. There is somethi