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you can’t win anything by sharing a post

Facebook win a car scam

At Prizeology we know what makes a good prize. We know that holidays are always very popular, the latest technology always goes down well, and giving away a lot of vouchers can be very successful. Unfortunately, we’re not the only people who know what makes a good prize.

Scammers are well aware of what people want to win, too, which is why they’re offering a Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro as a prize. (Actually, I’m not entirely sure what that is, but it’s definitely a vehicle.) What do you have to do to win? It’s amazingly easy, because all you have to do is share a Facebook post.

Unfortunately – yes, you’ve guessed it – this is a ‘like-farming’ scam. You’ll be asked to visit a website to validate your entry, but you won’t be entered in a prize draw. Instead, the website will gather your contact details and send you spam. That might not sound so bad, but believe me, it is.

This particular scam doesn’t have any tell-tale spelling mistakes, but the page isn’t verified (doesn’t have a blue tick), so it isn’t an official Toyota page, and it was created relatively recently (use the page transparency feature to check).

Another feature of the scam that should set alarm bells ringing is that Facebookers are asked to share the post to their own timeline, but this is against the Facebook terms and conditions for promotions. This is because if a user has the privacy settings on friends only, page administrators can’t tell whether an entrant has shared a post or not.

In this particular case, there was a more recent post which said that the prize draw had taken place, but had subsequently had to be re-run because the winner was too young to legally drive. This was a nice touch, but I’m afraid it was just an attempt to appear authentic and a bare-faced lie.

All I can say is don’t share this post or anything similar on any platform. If you aren’t sure whether a post is a scam or not, err on the side of caution and don’t share it. You might worry you’ll be missing out on the opportunity to win a new car, but – honestly – you won’t.

Read more about prize scams on the Scam Busting section of the Prizeology blog. A great site to read about prize scams, or check if a story you read on social media is fake, is That’s Nonsense.

Sarah Burns is Prizeology’s Chief Prizeologist and a National Trading Standards Scams Team Scambassador.

Scammers are well aware of what people want to win, too, which is why they’re offering a Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro as a prize.

Facebook is all about sharing. But sharing doesn’t work.

Bozhidar Bozhanov
May 22, 2019 · 2 min read

The cliche about Facebook — that it’s all about sharing —has been used many times, by media and Facebook executives alike. It’s about sharing with your friends, sharing what you like and care about, yada yada.

The sad thing is — sharing doesn’t work. It’s broken. Not conceptually, not as a way of social engagement, but from a purely functional perspective.

There are (roughly) four types of Facebook status updates: text-only, link-only, text-and-link, and media (containing photos and video).

In my case the most c o mmon type is the “text-and-link”. You share an interesting link, but also add some relevant commentary. Alternatively, you write a long and detailed post and add a few links here and there to strengthen your argument.

And by default these posts can’t be shared properly. When someone likes your text and presses “share”, Facebook assumes that your commentary is irrelevant and just shares the link. Without the status text, the link may be useless or out of context. And this is not what people intended to share in the first place.

Sadly, this is the default behavior on mobile as well as desktop. On desktop at least you have to option to press the 2nd “share” button in the dropdown and then choose “include original post”. On mobile you don’t have that option.

How does twitter handle that? It always includes the original post when you retweet something. If you retweet it with comment, the original text is also retained, not just the link.

Facebook somehow treats links as more important than text and because of that it breaks sharing. And it hasn’t figured out a way for so many years to do that properly. It has always been broken and inconsistent, although in different ways.

If a company whose service is about sharing can’t get the sharing functionality right for a decade, I’m worried about them handling anything. Including political advertising, fake news or personal data. They are just too complacent to actually do a good job at anything.

The cliche about Facebook — that it’s all about sharing —has been used many times, by media and Facebook executives alike. It’s about sharing with your friends, sharing what you like and care about…